The Repetitive Heart

Idle Hour Club - Project Lounge LP

It’s weird but I have a band again. You can listen and purchase a very reasonably priced copy on LP for $10+shipping at this link. I hope everyone’s suns are aglow, don’t let the internet suck anymore fun out of your life than it already has. <3 xo

Nostalgia-porn masquerading as rock music/toonz, please stop. You only cloud the waters.

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

TELEVISION: A Season In Hell
Soooo, here’s a compilation I’ve been working on for a while — an overview of the Richard Hell-era of Television, made up of rehearsals, live recordings and demos recorded between early 1974 and March 1975. Consider it a prequel of sorts to Kingdom Come. While the sound quality is rough on some of these tapes, the music is essential. This was a very different band than the one that would go on to record Marquee Moon a few years later — raw enough to make that album sound like Steely Dan by comparison. But if the playing is amateur-ish in places, it’s almost always thrillingly amateurish. And Hell definitely brought elements to the table that were lost once he was gone — a satirical, tongue-in-cheek humor, and his, um, unique bass stylings. He might not have been a very good bassist at this point, but he sure is enthusiastic, and that’s half the battle, isn’t it? I also get the feeling that Hell was the driving conceptual force behind the band at this stage — dig the elaborate and fanciful press release he penned (reprinted in Bryan Waterman’s excellent 33 1/3 volume): 

TOM VERLAINE - guitar, vocals, music, lyrics: Facts unknown. RICHARD HELL - bass, vocals, lyrics: Chip on shoulder. Mama’s boy. No personality. Highschool dropout. Mean. RICHARD LLOYD - guitar vocals: bleach-blond - mental institutions - male prostitute - suicide attempts. BILLY FICCA - drums: Blues bands in Philadelphia. Doesn’t talk much. Friendly. TELEVISION’s music fulfills the adolescent desire to fuck the girl you never met because you’ve just been run over by a car. Three minute songs of passion performed by four boys who make James Dean look like Little Nemo. Their sound is made distinctive by Hell’s rare Dan Electro bass, one that pops and grunts like no model presently available, and his unique spare patterns. Add to this Richard Lloyd’s blitzcrieg chop on his vintage Telecaster and Verlaine’s leads alternately psychotic Duane Eddy and Segovia on a ukelele with two strings gone. Verlaine, who uses an old Jazzmaster, when asked about the music said, “I don’t know. It tells the story. Like ‘The Hunch’ by the Robert Charles Quintet, or ‘Tornado’ by Dale Hawkins. Those cats could track it down. I’ll tell you the secret.”

Richard Hell, ladies and gentlemen, punk’s first PR man. 
Take note! This isn’t a totally comprehensive collection — in particular, interested parties should seek out the Neon Boys EP, Hell, Verlaine and Ficca’s first stab at greatness. There are also a few tracks I left out that are just not that good. But all in all, I think this is what you need when it comes to Richard Hell with Television. Without further ado, the tracklisting: 
ORK LOFT REHEARSALS, 19741. Fuck Rock and Roll (I’d Rather Read a Book)2. Horizontal Ascension3. I’m Gonna Find You4. I Don’t Care5. Marquee Moon
MAX’S KANSAS CITY, AUGUST 19746. You Rip My Feelings Out7. Excitement8. What I Heard9. Telepathic Valentine10. Change Your Channels11. Judy12. Psychotic Reaction
ENO / WILLIAMS DEMOS, DECEMBER 197413. Prove It14. Friction15. Venus De Milo16. Double Exposure17. Marquee Moon
CBGB, JANUARY 197518. Hard On Love (Fast Version)19. UFO20. Poor Circulation21. Breakin’ In My Heart
CBGB, MARCH 197522. Blank Generation
Download

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

TELEVISION: A Season In Hell

Soooo, here’s a compilation I’ve been working on for a while — an overview of the Richard Hell-era of Television, made up of rehearsals, live recordings and demos recorded between early 1974 and March 1975. Consider it a prequel of sorts to Kingdom Come. While the sound quality is rough on some of these tapes, the music is essential. This was a very different band than the one that would go on to record Marquee Moon a few years later — raw enough to make that album sound like Steely Dan by comparison. But if the playing is amateur-ish in places, it’s almost always thrillingly amateurish. And Hell definitely brought elements to the table that were lost once he was gone — a satirical, tongue-in-cheek humor, and his, um, unique bass stylings. He might not have been a very good bassist at this point, but he sure is enthusiastic, and that’s half the battle, isn’t it? I also get the feeling that Hell was the driving conceptual force behind the band at this stage — dig the elaborate and fanciful press release he penned (reprinted in Bryan Waterman’s excellent 33 1/3 volume): 

TOM VERLAINE - guitar, vocals, music, lyrics: Facts unknown. RICHARD HELL - bass, vocals, lyrics: Chip on shoulder. Mama’s boy. No personality. Highschool dropout. Mean. RICHARD LLOYD - guitar vocals: bleach-blond - mental institutions - male prostitute - suicide attempts. BILLY FICCA - drums: Blues bands in Philadelphia. Doesn’t talk much. Friendly. TELEVISION’s music fulfills the adolescent desire to fuck the girl you never met because you’ve just been run over by a car. Three minute songs of passion performed by four boys who make James Dean look like Little Nemo. Their sound is made distinctive by Hell’s rare Dan Electro bass, one that pops and grunts like no model presently available, and his unique spare patterns. Add to this Richard Lloyd’s blitzcrieg chop on his vintage Telecaster and Verlaine’s leads alternately psychotic Duane Eddy and Segovia on a ukelele with two strings gone. Verlaine, who uses an old Jazzmaster, when asked about the music said, “I don’t know. It tells the story. Like ‘The Hunch’ by the Robert Charles Quintet, or ‘Tornado’ by Dale Hawkins. Those cats could track it down. I’ll tell you the secret.”

Richard Hell, ladies and gentlemen, punk’s first PR man. 

Take note! This isn’t a totally comprehensive collection — in particular, interested parties should seek out the Neon Boys EP, Hell, Verlaine and Ficca’s first stab at greatness. There are also a few tracks I left out that are just not that good. But all in all, I think this is what you need when it comes to Richard Hell with Television. Without further ado, the tracklisting: 

ORK LOFT REHEARSALS, 1974
1. Fuck Rock and Roll (I’d Rather Read a Book)
2. Horizontal Ascension
3. I’m Gonna Find You
4. I Don’t Care
5. Marquee Moon

MAX’S KANSAS CITY, AUGUST 1974
6. You Rip My Feelings Out
7. Excitement
8. What I Heard
9. Telepathic Valentine
10. Change Your Channels
11. Judy
12. Psychotic Reaction

ENO / WILLIAMS DEMOS, DECEMBER 1974
13. Prove It
14. Friction
15. Venus De Milo
16. Double Exposure
17. Marquee Moon

CBGB, JANUARY 1975
18. Hard On Love (Fast Version)
19. UFO
20. Poor Circulation
21. Breakin’ In My Heart

CBGB, MARCH 1975
22. Blank Generation

Download

Photo by a wild and honest to god legend, Bob Reuter. Thank you x 314. (at New Orleans, LA)

Photo by a wild and honest to god legend, Bob Reuter. Thank you x 314. (at New Orleans, LA)

Stooges wax in stock

Stooges wax in stock

On the Saturn Bar, from “Geopsychic Wonders of New Orleans” 1979

     ”A quartet of interiors from the objet and bibelot-choked interior of the Saturn Bar on St. Claude Avenue — our first visit was literally breathtaking, and there was the added temporary curiosity of each table being decorated with an ancient and nonfunctioning cash register or adding machine of some sort — put there, we were informed, because they had not yet been moved into the back area. What is one to make of a neighborhood barroom„ with a relatively undistinguished exterior and an arresting tracery of neon and an interesting name that turns out to be such a confusion of the arts of the amateur painter, the taxidermist and the collector of ostensibly valueless small items that turn out, in artful arrangements, to be causes for epiphanous exclamations? Only that is is a Ninth Ward barroom that closes each night around eleven.
      The ceiling — a mummy, elderly ceiling fans with dusty blades, a panorama of the galaxy and paintings nailed to the ceiling — there are paintings everywhere in the Saturn (subaqueous scenes, bullfights, swamp scenes, horses in pastures, postcard vistas of all climes, a beggar-thin hand throwing snake-eyes (with a Brueghelian tableaux beneath of a shark about to gobble a smaller fish), cemetery scenes, symbolic portraits that might have been dreamed up by a cockeyed Redon); what is beneath the ceilings is no less bizarre — an Escorial of the bibelot — madonnas made entirely of glitter, a sea turtle mounted on the wall outlined in neon with, across its shell, the alluring word “Candy.” Perhaps the most hallucinatory terrain efor a cocktail ever conceived, carried out ruthlessly according to one of the most arcane Ninth Ward cosmologies ever to lurk beneath such a deceptively, preposterously ordinary exterior.”

— Jon Newlin/D. Eric Bookhardt (possibly earlier, but first book publication 1979, “typos” from the text)

Slinger Steve-McQueen style (at Courtesy Diner)

Slinger Steve-McQueen style (at Courtesy Diner)

at Magic Hostess HQ

at Magic Hostess HQ

He closed by outlining “M-theory,” which is based partly on ideas put forward years ago by another famed physicist, Caltech’s Richard Feynman. Hawking sees that theory as the only big idea that really explains what he has observed.”

(Source: science.nbcnews.com)